Lock-ups: Second-tier Elements | Pepperdine University | Pepperdine Community

Lock-ups: Second-tier Elements

The University wordmark may be combined with a secondary name (second-tier element) to form a lock-up. Both the wordmark and the second-tier element are set in Pantone 281 blue, and are separated by a vertical orange rule in Pantone 158. The second-tier name is set in Zurich Roman and is half the height of the Pepperdine word mark. Lock-ups can exist as linear components or stacked.

The wordmark should never be combined with more than one secondary element. Any third-tier elements should sit outside the lock-up formed by the wordmark and the secondary element.

The minimum width of a linear lock-up is 3.25 inches across. The minimum width of a stacked lock-up is 1.5 inches.

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Description of a second-tier element

Second-tier elements are departments, divisions, centers, or institutes which are not part of a school, serve a University-wide function, or report directly to the president's or provost's office. Schools are also second-tier elements but are now rendered as the expanded signatures.

Examples second-tier elements:

  • Alumni Affairs
  • Church Relations
  • Institute for Entertainment, Media, and Culture
  • Human Resources
  • Libraries
  • Bible Lectures
  • Center for Estate and Gift Planning
The list of second-tier elements is too lengthy to be listed here. Please contact Keith Lungwitz at 1440 with questions.

 

Availability

All lock-ups are available from the Pepperdine Asset Bank. Please contact Keith Lungwitz at 1440 if you do not find what you are looking for.

 

The obligation to create and maintain all enterprise-wide brand visuals rests with Integrated Marketing Communications. No other person or department acting as an official representative of the University is allowed to create or develop a unique brand mark for their own purpose. This is especially important for any communication or marketing materials that reach an audience outside the local campus environment, since an overabundance of unique identities dilutes the strength of the brand identity of the University as an enterprise.