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Faculty Bios

con tippens

Darryl Tippens
Provost of Pepperdine University

Darryl L. Tippens, Ph.D., author, scholar, and university administrator, has been the Provost of Pepperdine University since January 2001, where he also serves as a professor of english in the humanities division of Seaver College. Tippens has taught courses in english literature for over 30 years, with special interests in John Milton and William Shakespeare. He has taught university students in Louisiana, Texas, Oklahoma, and California, serving at three different Christian colleges or universities. He has been the recipient of several teaching awards. He is the author or editor of several books, including Shadow and Light: Literature and the Life of Faith and Pilgrim Heart: The Way of Jesus in Everyday Life. Tippens is past president of the South-Central Renaissance Conference and a long-time member of the Conference on Christianity and Literature.

Bob McQuaid

Bob McQuaid Jr.
Associate Professor of Information Systems

Bob McQuaid, Ph.D., is an associate professor of information systems for the Graziadio School of Business. McQuaid's academic interests lie in the development and application of practical analytical tools to solve complex operations problems. McQuaid has been implementing different technologies into his classrooms since 1999. After years of using technology in his curriculum, McQuaid believes that there are an equal number of good and bad choices for faculty to consider with regard to selection and implementation of technology solutions. McQuaid received his doctorate degree from the University of North Texas and is currently completing a second doctorate degree in information systems focusing on virtual collaboration technologies.

Susan Helm

Susan Helm
Associate Professor, Nutritional Science

Susan Helm, Ph.D., is an associate professor in nutritional science at Seaver College. Helm's academic interests lie in art and nutrition, nutrigenomics, and regulation of metabolism. Helm introduced technology into her curriculum when she participated in Pepperdine's iPad Research Study. She found that the iPad encouraged a great amount of discovery-learning activities and she decided to modify her method of delivering knowledge from lecture-style to group-activity style. Helm earned her doctorate in physiological chemistry from the University of California, Davis and earned an R.D. in clinical nutrition at Texas A&M and a master's of science degree from Cornell University.

Timothy Lucas

Timothy Lucas
Assistant Professor of Mathematics

Tim Lucas, Ph.D., is an assistant professor of mathematics at Seaver College. Lucas has always had an interest in incorporating technology into the classroom. This originally involved demonstrations and assignments that required mathematical software such as MATLAB or Maple. For the past several years, Lucas has been using spreadsheets in business calculus as a tool for analyzing data and investigating concepts in calculus. The introduction of the iPad in his fall 2010 course gave students the opportunity to work with a new, portable device to explore these concepts. Lucas looks forward to studying how the iPad impacts collaborative learning in the classroom. Lucas' primary research interests are in numerical analysis and applications to biology. He earned a master's degree and doctorate in mathematics from Duke University as well as an A.B. in mathematics from Occidental College.

Brian Fisher

Brian Fisher
Assistant Professor of Mathematics

Brian Fisher, Ph.D., is an assistant professor of mathematics whose primary research interests lie in undergraduate mathematics education. His current work focuses on student conceptualizations in multivariable calculus with a particular emphasis on the development of limits. Fisher has had numerous forays with technology in the classroom. He has been involved with projects incorporating tablet computers, text messaging, cloud computing, and iPads into the classroom. In particular, he is interested in how technology can be used to connect students with each other and with the instructor. Fisher earned his doctorate in mathematics from Oklahoma State University. He was a Mathematical Association of America project NExT Fellow and an Association of Mathematics Teacher Educators (AMTE) STaR Fellow, programs for new faculty members in mathematics and mathematics education, respectively.

Sharyl Corrado

Sharyl Corrado
Assistant Professor of History

Sharyl Corrado, Ph.D., is an assistant professor of history at Seaver College. Corrado specializes in Russian cultural history. Her teaching and research interests include modernity, colonialism, cross-cultural encounters and popular religion. Corrado took advantage of Courses (Pepperdine's Sakai instance) as an innovative way to manage, connect, and communicate with students in her undergraduate humanities class. When she incorporated Courses into her curriculum, she observed a change in student feedback. Corrado received her doctorate from the University of Illinois and received her master's degree in educational ministries from Wheaton College.

Gregory McNeal

Gregory McNeal
Associate Professor of Law

Gregory McNeal is an associate professor who teaches at the School of Law and the School of Public Policy. McNeal introduced clicker technology (also known as audience response systems) into his curriculum as way to break from traditional, lecture-style teaching. Since the inclusion of this technology, his students have become more engaged during class discussions. McNeal is a national security specialist focusing on the challenges associated with global security. He has expertise in national security law and policy, criminal law, and international law. McNeal previously served as assistant director of the Institute for Global Security and co-directed a transnational counterterrorism program for the U.S. Department of Justice. He also served as an adviser to the chief prosecutor of the Department of Defense Office of Military Commissions on matters related to the prosecution of suspected terrorists held in Guantanamo Bay's detention facility.

Spring Cooke

Spring Cooke
Visiting Faculty of Teaching, GSEP

Spring Cooke, Ph.D., teaches in the education and the social entrepreneurship and change graduate programs at the Graduate School of Education and Psychology. Her research focuses on improving math instruction in local communities and the roles of faith and technology in graduate-level studies. Cooke has served on Pepperdine University's Institutional Research Board committee, Diversity Council, and Urban Initiative. Before becoming a university educator, Cooke was an elementary school teacher and Beginning Teacher Support and Assessment provider. Cooke earned her doctorate degree in urban education with an emphasis in teacher education in multicultural societies from the University of Southern California.


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