Study Labs

Lab sessions are free and all School of Public Policy students are encouraged to attend.

Economics/Econometrics, Macroeconomics, Statistics (Methods), and Math Review Study Lab sessions are held several times a week by selected graduate assistants and review areas and topics examined by the core economics classes. Sessions are ideal for reviewing class material and improving skills in economic analysis. They are free and all School of Public Policy students are encouraged to attend.

Macro Student Leader/Mentor* - Spring 2021, Location: Zoom Link TA: Ryan Brown    

Wednesday

5:00 PM - 7:00 PM

Zoom link: https://pepperdine.zoom.us/j/82578116648

Macro Lab - Spring 2021, Location: Zoom Link TA: John Hayes  

Thursday

12:00 PM - 2:00 PM

Zoom link: https://zoom.us/j/93844621464?pwd=N2dEQ0dkQ3lKRjlpRXRkSnpXZ0t1Zz09
Writing Lab** - Spring 2021, Location: Zoom Link TA: Emily Milnes

Wednesday

11:00 AM - 12:00 PM

Zoom link: https://pepperdine.zoom.us/j/81159251795

Econometrics Lab - Spring 2021, Location: Zoom Link TA: Katlyn Koegel

Tuesday

12:00 PM - 1:00 PM

Zoom link: https://zoom.us/j/6927004270?pwd=VjBxRlhvNkpHNmY2MU9UVy9ObjFUdz09

 

*Macro Student Leader is to help students with assignment support and as a class leader & mentor and does not have access to traditional TA (Study Lab) materials

**Please bring written material and questions during scheduled lab hours. Written material can be in draft form. Assistance will include tops for macro-level editing, recommendations on developing coherent organization, and guidelines for improving writing and style. 

FAQ

Q. Do I have to attend?
A. Yes. Attendance will be taken.

Q. But do I really have to attend? I'm taking Prof. Sexton's class, not Prof. Prieger's.
A. Yes. Regardless of which microeconomics class you take, you will need these mathematical tools for the core macroeconomics class next semester (at least).

Q. But do I really have to attend? I already know all this math.
A. It would still be good to come, if for no other reason to help your fellow students who are not as mathematically prepared as you are.